1. Chrystalla Mouza
  2. Associate Professor
  3. WeC4Communities (We Compute for our Communities): Community-Focused Computing for Minoritized Youth
  4. University of Delaware
  1. Lori Pollock
  2. https://www.eecis.udel.edu/~pollock/
  3. Professor
  4. WeC4Communities (We Compute for our Communities): Community-Focused Computing for Minoritized Youth
  5. University of Delaware
  1. Rosalie Rolon Dow
  2. Associate Professor
  3. WeC4Communities (We Compute for our Communities): Community-Focused Computing for Minoritized Youth
  4. University of Delaware
Public Discussion
  • Icon for: Kevin Brown

    Kevin Brown

    Facilitator
    March 20, 2017 | 01:49 p.m.

    Very much on board with the focus on intervening at early ages , and informally as well as formally, in order to overcome cultural messages that computer science isn’t open or relevant to the lives of underrepresented youth or women of all colors. I would be interested in learning more about the challenges you see in overcoming these subtle and not-so-subtle biases and the practices you think will be effective in promoting a sense of belonging in CS? In terms of outcomes, how do you plan to measure progress, e.g. more interest/engagement in CS, more CS or STEM classwork, higher grades in STEM coursework, majoring in CS or another STEM field in college, getting a CS-related job? I’d also like to hear more about the role of industry here, particularly if your business partners are providing ideas, materials, mentors/teachers, and/or hands-on learning opportunities for minority youth?

  • Icon for: Lori Pollock

    Lori Pollock

    Co-Presenter
    March 22, 2017 | 02:00 p.m.

    We will measure progress by pre/post content knowledge in computational thinking, pre/post surveys of confidence, interest, and sense of belonging, awareness of connections between computing and community life; analysis of enrollment numbers during project funding for youth participants at the two informal learning settings, and eventually enrollment numbers in the CS pathway courses in the state.  Industry provides career awareness opportunities to the youth as well as a source for volunteers in the community and possibly materials. 

  • Icon for: Rosann Tung

    Rosann Tung

    Facilitator
    March 21, 2017 | 08:33 p.m.

    I have the same questions as Kevin after watching your video. I appreciate the community engaged model that focuses on the assets of the region. Who is providing the teaching/mentorship in these out-of-school settings? Are they CS students from local universities, CS teachers or professors, computer scientists from local companies? How are they being trained? If they do not share a cultural background with the students, how are they learning to be culturally responsive and acknowledge their own cultural biases? In addition, I'm wondering if you could give an example of "computational artifacts culturally responsive to their community contexts" (from your short written description).

     

     

  • Icon for: Lori Pollock

    Lori Pollock

    Co-Presenter
    March 22, 2017 | 01:56 p.m.

    We will be basing our volunteer training on culturally-response frameworks, where culturally-responsive frameworks integrate knowledge relevant to students’ identities and communities with computational learning activities, maximizing the potential for increasing the engagement, competence and belonging of underrepresented youth in computing education.  One of team members is an expert in culturally-responsive frameworks.  Some of the team has been designing and conducting professional development for teachers in CS.  We will build on that Partner4CS experience as well as work with our cultural expert to design training for working with students of diverse cultural backgrounds.  The volunteers will be teams of Univ of Delaware students with CS background and community volunteers and staff very familiar with the culture of the community.  They may include parents and industry volunteers as well as teachers.  An example of computational artifacts culturally responsive to their community contexts is : Make a game where you earn points for picking healthy foods and lose points for picking unhealthy ones.

  • Icon for: Rosalie Rolon Dow

    Rosalie Rolon Dow

    Co-Presenter
    March 24, 2017 | 09:02 a.m.

    To build on what Lori posted, the idea of the culturally responsive computational artifacts is to have them come out of students knowledge or examination of both assets and challenges in their communities.  So a game on healthy foods would be responding to an examination of what food resources are available (or not available) in their community.  Other examples would be the development of a website that featured an aspect of their community (for example, local business owners in their community; resources for teens in the community) or a website particular historical topic of their community.  There are many possibilities for community based artifacts. The idea is to integrate community inquiry and knowledge into all of the computing science activities that the youth engage in.     

  • Icon for: Rosann Tung

    Rosann Tung

    Facilitator
    March 26, 2017 | 11:27 a.m.

    Lori and Rosalie, Thank you for your detailed answers to my questions! Your examples of culturally responsive computational artifacts are inspiring. These types of relevant projects will engage students more deeply in learning, because students will be empowered to build on their community's assets and address their community's challenges.

    Rosann

  • Icon for: Chris Boynton, EdD

    Chris Boynton, EdD

    March 22, 2017 | 12:01 p.m.

    I love the idea about reaching to 8th grade and creating those early efforts for computer science. I think informal spaces are under utilized for these efforts.  We have a program in our region for AA girls that uses fashion designing as a vehicle for computer science. 

  • Icon for: Chrystalla Mouza

    Chrystalla Mouza

    Presenter
    March 26, 2017 | 09:53 a.m.

    Chris, would love to hear more about your work with girls. Given that the informal settings we will be working with are not gender specific, we must provide some flexibility in the nature of topics. We think that by focusing on issues that children find important for their own communities we can create the right motivational context for them to engage with the work.

  • Further posting is closed as the event has ended.