Public Discussion

  • Icon for: Joni Falk

    Joni Falk

    Center Co-Director
    March 20, 2017 | 05:08 p.m.

    This looks like a really interesting pilot program!  Is this your first year or are you building on a prior effort? You say that you currently reach 50 high schools students each summer. Are you hoping to scale up? What pedagogical strategies  for engaging students in research have you implemented that you find particularly beneficial for under-served populations? How do you envision your impact and how will you measure it? I look forward to hearing more. You might enjoy viewing a somewhat related video on water research in HS at: http://includes2017.videohall.com/presentations...

  • Icon for: Cassie Xu

    Cassie Xu

    Presenter
    March 20, 2017 | 07:36 p.m.

    This is our 11th summer doing the project. We are hoping to scale the project to other research institutions in the New York metro area and the Lower Hudson Valley. Some key components of the program in terms of strategy include: getting the students to do authentic research that follow rigorous data protocols, working and learning in teams, having multiple layers of mentors, being in a research environment like Lamont-Doherty where they get to not only see how other scientists do research but they can also feel a sense of belonging there themselves, and providing them opportunities to engage in science throughout the academic year with presentations at professional science meetings and coursework. 

    We envision our impact with our INCLUDES pilot to be the creation of about 12 more research sites just like ours that operate in clusters and utilize different partners (i.e. research institution, informal learning organization, private foundation, and a school network). We will evaluate our success based on whether or not we have a pilot program in place at one or more of our research partner organizations by the end of the INCLUDES pilot grant. We will also evaluate our success by looking at how we are able to develop a common agenda, shared metrics, and implementation plans between the 50+ individuals from various organizations who are involved in this process with us. 

  • Icon for: Joni Falk

    Joni Falk

    Center Co-Director
    March 23, 2017 | 05:33 p.m.

    Thanks for the clear reply as to how you will measure your success of the INCLUDES pilot. I think it is  interesting to evaluate your success in developing common metrics, a common agenda and implementation plan between partners. That will give you a lot of information as to the ease and challenges of scaling this project up to 12 more research sites. It sounds like you have data in hand that the participants in your project benefit from participating. Will be interesting to see if sites that adapt or replicate your program can achieve similar results. A very interesting project!

  • Icon for: Robert Newton

    Robert Newton

    Co-Presenter
    March 28, 2017 | 02:50 a.m.

    Hi Joni -- in our experience, useful tracking data on the participants of programs such as these take several years, at least, to compile.  Thus our focus during the INCLUDES funding period per se is on process metrics and program implementations.  In the longer run, we are working with partners in the Science Research Mentoring Consortium (an project that came out of an American Museum of Natural History / Pinkerton Foundation partnership) to establish a set of metrics, including longitudinal tracking of participants.  Those tools, which SRMC is applying to their participating programs, will be adapted to whichever programs in the EER alliance get up and running.  -- Bob

  • Icon for: Barbara Rogoff

    Barbara Rogoff

    Facilitator
    March 20, 2017 | 05:18 p.m.

    Congratulations on your project!  I'm wondering how the multi-layered mentoring model works?

  • Icon for: Cassie Xu

    Cassie Xu

    Presenter
    March 20, 2017 | 07:42 p.m.

    This just means that students should have several mentoring relationships available to them within their summer research experiences, including peer, near-peer, and hierarchical (student-student, undergraduate-student, scientist-student, teacher-student, etc.) mentoring. Students will get different things from different people, both because they have different roles in the program and because they have their own complex histories, capacities and deficits. The goal is to provide as diverse a set of opportunities for development as possible.

  • Icon for: Robert Newton

    Robert Newton

    Co-Presenter
    March 28, 2017 | 02:50 a.m.

    To add a bit of detail to Cassie's note:

    In our core mentee placements, the ones we have the most influence over:

    HS students are organized into research teams with anywhere from 2 to about 8 students.  (At the larger end, the kids might be working on field experiments in wetland restoration techniques; at the smaller scale they might be laboratory experiments.)  The teams are balanced between newcomers and students who had a previous year in the Program.  A college student, often a science major who was in our program as a HS student, is assigned as the Team Leader (TL).  The TL is responsible for the day-to-day operations: scheduling, transportation, equipment check lists, etc.  The team has a mentoring scientist, typically a senior Lamont-Doherty researcher, but sometimes one of the more experienced science teachers or an early-career Columbia scientist.  There are usually two people, a lead science teacher and the Program Director, who oversee all of the summer activities.  Finally, every HS student is assigned an individual mentor.  These are Lamonters, typically grad students and post docs, but could be from any level, who volunteer to have lunch one day a week with "their" HS student.  These lunchtime conversations, which last about 90 minutes, can cover anything.  We encourage the mentors to be curious about the students' lives, bot their backgrounds and their thoughts about the future.  We tell the mentees, "This is your time, you can ask your mentor about anything you're curious about or need help with." We hear back that there is a lot of discussion about how one gets from high school to grad school and a career in science. 

    So ... from the high school student's point of view:

    She's got her friends on the team, some of whom are novices like her, but some of whom have been here before and know the ropes.  She's got a college student, usually from a similar background, and usually someone who is already majoring in a science or engineering field.  She's got her scientist mentor.  She's got the program managers, who are not in the thick of her project, but are available for any interpersonal/organizational/personal issues that come up.  And she's got a grad student or post-doc for 90 minutes each week.

    As Cassie said: each student creates her own path through this network of support, using the resources to backfill deficits, learn the technical and scientific material, work through any interpersonal issues, think about the future, etc.  On the surface, it seems that the Team Leaders are at the center of the mentoring experience.  They have a tremendous amount of contact with the mentees and are in a sort of "sweet spot" of being closely identified with the HS students and also being well along the journey toward a STEM career.  But in fact, we believe it is the layered, multi-dimensional mentoring environment that works. 

  • Icon for: Leslie Goodyear

    Leslie Goodyear

    Facilitator
    March 23, 2017 | 09:23 a.m.

    What great images of students doing science! When you think about scaling up in NYC, what does that mean - and will it be to scale your model, or to also incorporate new elements as you bring in new partners?

  • Icon for: Cassie Xu

    Cassie Xu

    Presenter
    March 24, 2017 | 07:57 a.m.

    We are aiming to have a new site up towards the end of our INCLUDES pilot, a relatively small one but it will be a new site that has not had a program before. The fundamental model will be the same, which is that there is a research department/institution that will serve as the hub, then an informal learning partner or fieldwork site, then a network of schools to recruit students from, as well as a foundation/local private funder to assist with direct costs. We may add new program elements such as new areas of research (we're currently just focused on environmental chemistry) and new age groups (we currently only work with juniors and seniors in high school), but the cluster model that we have is the one we are trying to scale.

  • Small default profile

    Erica Harvey

    Higher Ed Faculty
    March 24, 2017 | 01:26 p.m.

    I heard about this project at the CAHSI conference recently, and I really like the model!  I'm curious about what year in high school your students are, whether or not it is residential (and how you manage that if so) and if they can or do participate more than once.  I'm also curious about how you manage the courses in the ecology example.  Do you offer it online, or do students come to the center, do they get high school and/or college credit for it, do they pay for it?  Our First Two pilot is implementing a residential, 2 week research experience for rural, first-generation students who are about to enter college.  As part of the program, they undertake a year long course and become Hometown Ambassadors.  One of our puzzles is how to handle the course part, given that students will be at all different colleges.

  • Icon for: Cassie Xu

    Cassie Xu

    Presenter
    March 24, 2017 | 01:56 p.m.

    Thanks for your note Erica. The high school students are juniors or seniors, or rising college freshman. This is not a residential program. Students come from the 5 boroughs of NYC and neighborhoods around Lamont-Doherty (i.e. Rockland, Bergen, Westchester counties). We typically see a high school student for 2 years, starting in their junior year. And in many cases, our undergraduates are alumni of the program. We find that having them for 2 years is really effective, they get something new from it each year and even if they come back as an undergrad, they will take on new responsibilities/roles, so it's a new learning experience yet again.

    We offer our courses on Columbia University's main campus, accessible by public transportation. We don't currently offer credit for it but we're working with the NYC Department of Education on this. Courses are free. Students get paid a stipend to attend the summer program, we cover their breakfasts and lunches, as well as their metrocards to take the subway to campus.

    With your course, what are your concerns specifically at each college? If you can link me to your video, that'd be great. I'd love to take a look and chat some more.

  • Icon for: Allison Rowe

    Allison Rowe

    Communications Coordinator
    March 27, 2017 | 03:32 p.m.

         Dear SSFRP team-- Thanks for sharing this awesome video! I am inspired by the combination of learning methods you employ over the summer (research, lectures, readings, student-led article discussions), the multi-layered mentoring model, and the encouragement for undergraduates who are alumni of the high school program to return to the program with new roles, including mentoring younger students, benefiting both age groups.

         I see many opportunities for connection between your project and ours, based out of the University of Maine (http://includes2017.videohall.com/presentations...), including 1) the focus on environmental research, 2) the structure of a research department/institution serving as a hub connecting a network of local high schools, 3) the engagement of both students and teachers, and 4) the student-mentor relationships, where students meet weekly with their mentors. Would you be interested in comparing notes on these topics?

         I also noticed you hope to scale-up your program at other research institutions in the New York metro area. We have linked up with a partner from the City College of New York. Given your expertise in environmental research in the region and your local connections, I wonder if somehow we could collaborate with both our partner and your team to get a research program for high school students up and running at CCNY!

         If you are interested in touching base to discuss how we might work together in the areas where our projects overlap, please feel free to reach out to us! -Allie (Communications Coordinator, Allison.Rowe@maine.edu) and Dr. Musavi (PI, musavi@maine.edu).

  • Icon for: Robert Newton

    Robert Newton

    Co-Presenter
    March 28, 2017 | 02:49 a.m.

    We'd be very interesting in working with your partner at City College.  We have a very engaged partner there who is right now exploring what a research immersion implementation would look like.  This would be a good time to link her with your partner, avoid duplications and leverage each other's efforts. 

  • Further posting is closed as the event has ended.

  1. Cassie Xu
  2. Early Engagement in Research: Key to STEM retention
  3. Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University
  1. Robert Newton
  2. Senior Research Scientist
  3. Early Engagement in Research: Key to STEM retention
  4. Columbia University
  1. Margie Turrin
  2. http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/user/mkt
  3. Education Coordinator
  4. Early Engagement in Research: Key to STEM retention
  5. Columbia University

Early Engagement in Research: Key to STEM retention
1649310

LDEO’s multi-leveled SSFRP serves students from non-competitive-entry public schools; over 80% are from groups under-represented in STEM careers, about 60% are female. 100% of our alumni have attended college; approximately 50% declare STEM majors. 100% of participating teachers have remained in public schools. Participating undergraduates are returning alums for whom this is a first in-specialty employment, and one with a social service component, often a strong motivator for under-served students. The program is adapted to the logistical and financial constraints of a research organization and is institutionalized in the mainstream of educational work at LDEO.  It has broad support among PIs, early career scientists and the Directorate. We are seeking to build an Alliance would assist an additional 12 research departments in implementing immersive mentoring programs adapted to their specific situations. The impacted populations of students and educators in the New York/New Jersey area would quadruple. Based on Lamont’s experience and research on outcomes, this model may well scale up nationally and have a major impact on diversity in the STEM professions as quickly as a decade in the future.