Public Discussion

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    Dan Zietlow

    Informal Educator
    March 20, 2017 | 02:46 p.m.

    Interesting project!  Addressing community-specific geoscience problems seems like a great way to get underserved populations involved.  What are some of the ways that you will engage these communities to tackle resource issues or seismic hazards and show different career paths?  Will you have community members out in the field installing seismometers or cleaning up watersheds, provide open-to-the-public lectures, after-school groups, etc.?

  • Icon for: Donna Charlevoix

    Donna Charlevoix

    Presenter
    March 20, 2017 | 05:43 p.m.

    Thanks for your questions Dan - they are good ones! We have some ideas that I'll outline below. Broadly, our project is designed to answer the type of questions you pose. How *do* we engage students and communities? What opportunities can we leverage and what barriers might we need to overcome?

    We have three pilot areas and they are all taking different approaches, working to identify an approach that is the best fit for the stakeholders they are engaging and the community issue they are tackling. For example, the Oklahoma Tribal Alliance is looking at induced seismicity throughout the state and the impacts on energy production, jobs, and the environment. Native tribes have very strong ties to the land and the fist step of engaging the state-wide group with our project team is to hold a convening to both build trust and develop a participatory plan. 

    The project activities for all three pilot areas will be driven by the needs of the local community. At this point, it is not likely there will be instrument installation or things of that nature due to the funding availability. We are aiming to develop sustainable, engagement plans that will leverage existing local resources. The role of the national leadership team is to bring in geoscience resources and expertise from across the country to the local pilots.

    Finally, you offered some possible ways to engage the community and provide information to students about careers in geoscience. As our pilots mature and develop stronger alliances, many of the items you list (public lectures, after school programs, etc.) may be a part of their activities. Rather than be prescriptive, we are working with the local pilots to develop activities that will fit into their local alliance and enhance their communities.   

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    Dan Zietlow

    Informal Educator
    March 21, 2017 | 05:26 p.m.

    Great, thanks for the info!

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    Sally McGill

    Higher Ed Faculty
    March 20, 2017 | 08:41 p.m.

    Hi Dan,

    In the San Bernardino Alliance, we are planning an event for March 25, 2017 in which students from a local high school and two local community colleges will visit our campus, take a hike to the San Andreas fault, tour buildings on campus that have been seismically retrofitted and ask questions of a geology alumni career panel over a brown bag lunch.  The day will conclude with an assignment for the students to interview their peers and family members about their thoughts about the most important geoscience issues in their community.  Teachers will collect the student interview results, which will be used to guide planning for future events, perhaps even a future field trip designed by the students for their families.

    One possible community issue we may engage with is the continued presence old, unreinforced masonry buildings within the city of San Bernardino.  These buildings are a threat to life safety in future earthquakes.

     

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    Dan Zietlow

    Informal Educator
    March 21, 2017 | 05:26 p.m.

    Sounds cool, thanks for the response!

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  • Icon for: Barbara Rogoff

    Barbara Rogoff

    Facilitator
    March 20, 2017 | 10:02 p.m.

    Great project!  I'm curious about the Oklahoma project, which is especially timely.  I wonder how the students are engaging in the project.  What do they do?  Is it helping with gathering data?  Activism? 

  • Icon for: Cathy Manduca

    Cathy Manduca

    Co-Presenter
    March 21, 2017 | 11:42 a.m.

    Hi Barbara -

    The Oklahoma project is meeting this week to move forward in answering these questions!  All of our regional alliances are starting with community planning meetings.  Oklahoma is having theirs this week.

  • Icon for: Barbara Rogoff

    Barbara Rogoff

    Facilitator
    March 21, 2017 | 07:03 p.m.

    Good luck!  I imagine there will be a lot of local interest in this project in Oklahoma.

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    John Taber

    Guest
    March 23, 2017 | 09:20 p.m.

    Hi Barbara,

    While we will be first listening to the community to learn what approaches they think would be most effective, we will be offering active learning opportunities that we have developed via other projects, such as the Quake Catcher Network, which provides simple ground motion sensors that students can use to record earthquakes as part of a larger network.  

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  • Icon for: Lisa Lynn

    Lisa Lynn

    March 21, 2017 | 09:15 a.m.

    This is a very cool project. I like the focus on community-relevant concerns and activism. Besides the impact on public value of and support for geoscience, are you measuring any outcomes for the students involved, such as science identity, interest in a geoscience career, or the proportion of students who choose a geoscience major in college, etc.? I realize those may be longer-term goals and not data you'll have right away! Just wondering how you're thinking about the impact on the students who are involved.

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    Barbara Nagle

    Guest
    March 22, 2017 | 02:45 p.m.

    Hi Lisa, To add to Cathy's answer, we are getting input from our three Regional Alliances to hone in on possible outcome measures related to science identity, interest, confidence, and valuing science. 

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  • Icon for: Cathy Manduca

    Cathy Manduca

    Co-Presenter
    March 21, 2017 | 11:44 a.m.

    Hi Lisa -

    Yes these things are of high interest and we are getting ready to test an instrument that we hope will be quick and useful across educational levels. 

    You may also be interested in the InTeGrate Attitudinal Instrument which was developed by one of our alliance partners for use with undergraduates to get at just these things.  It was given pre-post as part of classroom instruction.  http://serc.carleton.edu/integrate/about/iai.html

  • Icon for: Lisa Lynn

    Lisa Lynn

    March 23, 2017 | 09:52 a.m.

    Cathy and Barbara, thanks for your replies and for sharing this tool! I will need to check it out! I think it's great that you're getting input from the Regional Alliances in developing outcome measures, using that broad base of expertise to identify the important outcomes.

    Partially related conversation here (http://includes2017.videohall.com/presentations...) about consulting partners on outcomes as a tenet of collective impact work. I'm sure this is coming up in lots of threads.

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  • Icon for: Leslie Goodyear

    Leslie Goodyear

    Facilitator
    March 23, 2017 | 09:13 a.m.

    What an interesting project! I'm particularly interested in how you plan to support these critical transitions and ensure that students are putting their learning in the larger community and career contexts.

  • Icon for: Cathy Manduca

    Cathy Manduca

    Co-Presenter
    March 23, 2017 | 10:52 a.m.

    Leslie -

    The San Bernadino Alliance is the furthest down this path.  They are making use of geology clubs which pull students from multiple levels and institutions.  You can learn more here: http://serc.carleton.edu/earthconnections/sanbe...

    We expect that each regional alliance will have a different strategy that suits their community and its existing resources/structure/connections.

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  1. Donna Charlevoix
  2. Program Director
  3. EarthConnections: Community Pathways to Geoscience Careers
  4. http://serc.carleton.edu/earthconnections/index.html
  5. UNAVCO
  1. Garry Harris
  2. http://www.csc-atl.org
  3. Managing Director
  4. EarthConnections: Community Pathways to Geoscience Careers
  5. http://serc.carleton.edu/earthconnections/index.html
  6. Center for Sustainable Communities
  1. Cathy Manduca
  2. Director
  3. EarthConnections: Community Pathways to Geoscience Careers
  4. http://serc.carleton.edu/earthconnections/index.html
  5. SERC, Carleton College

EarthConnections: Community Pathways to Geoscience Careers
1649367

EarthConnections is based in communities – linking students, educators, and community leaders together to address a local challenge that can be explored by the students using geoscience. By working with students from diverse backgrounds, the project team is developing a network of people and resources to prepare students to work in their communities addressing environmental hazards and resource issues directly impacting their local community. This project brings together partners who have led successful national efforts addressing components of these challenges with partners in three regions to create pathways in three regional pilots, focusing on key academic transitions in three diverse US communities—Atlanta, Georgia; San Bernardino, California; and Oklahoma—and will use these pathways as laboratories and catalysts for a systemic change in geoscience and geoscience education. These pathways will include multiple opportunities for students to 1) learn geoscience in the context of compelling local issues, 2) use geoscience to address local challenges, and 3) explore geoscience career pathways.

The EarthConnections collective impact alliance develops regionally focused, Earth education pathways that support and guide students from engagement in relevant, Earth-related science at an early age through the many steps and transitions to geoscience-related careers. EarthConnections advances the use of participatory approaches in the geosciences, nurturing a generation of future scientists who are well-versed in methods and strategies for community engagement. This approach has broad, local community impact and will increase the public’s value of and support for geoscience.