Public Discussion
  • Icon for: Leslie Goodyear

    Leslie Goodyear

    Facilitator
    March 20, 2017 | 10:50 a.m.

    What an inspiring video! It's obvious that the attendees at the filmed workshop are engaged, excited and passionate about their work. What do we know about algebra-taking trends and how can those data be used to influence others about the importance of this educational milestone?

  • Icon for: Marcus Hung

    Marcus Hung

    Presenter
    March 20, 2017 | 11:04 p.m.

    Thanks Leslie! The data around the importance of Algebra is out there somewhere-- can someone point us to that? More so than Algebra and other critical school math subjects, the National Alliance that we're working on is also concerned about mathematical literacy for all students- particularly the bottom quartile. This is the heart of the work that you see in the video where teachers, students, parents, community organizers, university educators, mathematicians, and others are coming together to raise a national discussion about how to best understand what to teach, how to teach it, and what/how to assess it. More to come in upcoming meetings/work! Thanks!

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    Mary Project

    Guest
    March 27, 2017 | 04:26 p.m.

    Hi Leslie and Marcus, yes there are various articles going back as far as 80s, indicating, for example, that Algebra I is a gatekeeper course to higher math courses, and failing algebra I is associated with dropping out of high school.  And, while there are recent articles suggesting that not all students are "ready" for algebra, these studies do not use pedagogies or the peer culture to engage students.  So sad to see that, in some programs and schools out there, students are not being approached with pedagogies that WILL engage them and build a culture for learning.    

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    Nancy Shapiro

    Guest
    March 20, 2017 | 11:17 a.m.

    "What to teach and how to teach," but also "WHO will teach?" Thank you for this inspiring project.  I am increasingly concerned that our youngest and most vulnerable students are the ones who are least likely to have knowledgable teachers.  How are you addressing the lack of mathematics understanding among elementary school teachers?  I am intrigued by the local, grow-your-own models that find ways to prime the pump by bringing highly talented to high need schools.  Does anyone know of any projects that are doing that?  Starting with elementary school poses the problem of a long time horizon, but it seems to me to be the only way to expand the pipeline for the long term future.

  • Icon for: Marcus Hung

    Marcus Hung

    Presenter
    March 20, 2017 | 11:07 p.m.

    Thats a great question Nancy! Who will teach is a big question that we can't forget and is why we need thoughtful higher ed administrators like yourself who will help to develop this pipeline for a long term future. I also wonder about proven models of developing mathematically literate elementary school teachers who particularly come from the community in which they work in-- can anyone cite any that they know of?

  • Icon for: Jeanne Century

    Jeanne Century

    Director/Research Associate Professor
    March 21, 2017 | 02:16 p.m.

    Hi Marcus - I don't know about "proven models," but I am curious about whether your initiative has an opinion about elementary classroom teachers versus school-based specialists teaching mathematics? I know this has been a long-standing (and unanswered) question in conversations about elementary science.

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    Ben Moynihan

    Guest
    March 26, 2017 | 01:52 p.m.

    Hi Nancy, Jeanne and Marcus, 

    Thanks for your questions and replies. The Math Literacy Initiative (MLI) at The Ohio State University - Mansfield Campus is one group participating in this NSF INCLUDES effort which has been working with elementary school teachers, as I understand it, using a combination of Algebra Project pedagogical strategies, lesson study, and more, to help elementary teachers deepen their content knowledge and expand their instructional repertoire.  Please see https://mansfield.osu.edu/initiatives/math-lite... and please contact Lee McEwan, mcewan1@osu.edu and Terri Bucci, bucci5@osu.edu for more information on the work of the MLI.   

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    David Dennis

    Guest
    March 27, 2017 | 08:20 a.m.

    Hi: you might also contact Mrs. Jessie Cooper-Gibbs, who is the coordinator of the PD program for the Southern Initiative Algebra Project (SIAP) and a trainer for the Algebra Project. She and her team have worked with elementary school teachers as part of the SIAP PK-16 model and the Algebra PD team since 1998. You may contact Mary West and Ben Moynihan at the Algebra Project for data on their success in Mississippi, Weldon, NC, St. Helena, SC, and Petersburg, Va. 

    Mrs. Gibbs may be contacted at jcoopergibbs@aol.com or 504-237-1528. Mr Moynihan and Is West may be contacted at 617-491-0200.

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    Lee McEwan

    Guest
    March 27, 2017 | 02:23 p.m.

    Hi Jeanne, either I or Terri Bucci would be happy to talk to you about our work with elementary teachers in Ohio with the OSU Mathematics Literacy Initiative. Also, we are putting together a webinar for anyone who would like to learn about the MLI, and ways we might partner. We will send a message out through the network when that gets scheduled.

  • Icon for: Barbara Rogoff

    Barbara Rogoff

    Facilitator
    March 20, 2017 | 01:30 p.m.

    This is such an important project for the success of our nation.  I have wondered whether one way to make things work better for students who struggle with school would be to teach them like in the 'gifted' classes -- using projects that interest them and connect with their everyday lives, with opportunities to shape the lessons according to their interests.  Is there research that would support or refute using this analogy?

  • Icon for: Marcus Hung

    Marcus Hung

    Presenter
    March 20, 2017 | 11:14 p.m.

    I don't know about research to support/refute this, but having taught high school math for over a decade in an urban school district I wouldn't hesitate one moment to approach my classes with the same level of intention, resources, and care that the "gifted" classes receive because our bottom quartile students are our most precious population and if we aren't approaching them with the same level of intention, resources, and care then we'll continue to have such a divide in our inequitable school system. I agree this is the very conversation that our nation needs to engage in as we move forward! Thanks Barbara!

  • Icon for: Barbara Rogoff

    Barbara Rogoff

    Facilitator
    March 21, 2017 | 03:56 a.m.

    Cool!  It seems to me to be a good metaphor, to teach everyone like 'gifted students.'

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    Mary Project

    Guest
    March 27, 2017 | 04:24 p.m.

    Yes Barbara that is so true, folks in the project have said the same -- that students performing in the bottom quartile should be approached for the interests that they have, and should bring their own creativity to learning as we do for "gifted and talented".   (PS Hello from your classmate -- we had the same advisors in grad school -- JK and BW/JW!)

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    Jonathan Rochkind

    Guest
    March 28, 2017 | 10:43 a.m.

    Hello Barbara,


    When I am with school and district administrators discussing the type of work in an Algebra Project classroom (or in a Young People's Project out-of-school activity) I almost always get the surprised comment that this sort of engaged project work is more akin to a gifted and talented program than anything else. It is a discredit that the norm is for high-quality activities to be reserved for gifted programs and not made accessible to all students, and I think it is a wonderful part of the Algebra Project process that advanced activities are included. 

  • Icon for: Jeanne Century

    Jeanne Century

    Director/Research Associate Professor
    March 20, 2017 | 04:39 p.m.

    This inspiring video left me hungry to know what happened in that February meeting (described in the summary). We've seen so many collaborative and collective efforts to bring about change - I'm eager to hear the next steps for this group. What happened? What was said? What is happening next?

  • Icon for: Marcus Hung

    Marcus Hung

    Presenter
    March 20, 2017 | 11:17 p.m.

    I'm glad you felt like that and are eager to learn more Jeanne! There will be a follow up meeting in May with the same folks and in the mean time there are multiple working groups that are furthering the vision for a national design and blueprint on how this alliance can further tackle the essential questions that we talked about in February. If you're interested in getting involved please contact ben@algebra.org and inquire about how to get involved- thanks!

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    Ben Moynihan

    Guest
    March 26, 2017 | 02:00 p.m.

    Greetings Jeanne, Marcus and All: Yes, there will a NSF INCLUDES Conference at the St. Louis Airport Hilton Friday, May 19th (start 5pm CDT) - Sunday, May 21st, 2017 (end 1pm CDT), supported by DCL: NSF INCLUDES #1650533: Supporting a Collective Impact Approach from the Bottom Up. As Marcus notes, if you would like further information about this session, please email ben@algebra.org and I'll be happy to follow up with you about this gathering.  Best, Ben

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    Gay Stewart

    Guest
    March 20, 2017 | 06:41 p.m.

    I echo Jeanne. Further, it sounds like you are working with an inspired group of teachers which is where great things happen for understanding how to prepare future teachers! I am deeply involved in pre-service teacher preparation. I work with high school teachers across all of STEM, but only physics support for elementary teachers right now, although faculty in the WVU Center for Excellence in STEM Education are really starting to gear up our research in elementary math and computer science preparation. We would love to talk to you more as you make "how to teach" more concrete. 

  • Icon for: Marcus Hung

    Marcus Hung

    Presenter
    March 20, 2017 | 11:19 p.m.

    Yes! That's so great that you're working with preparing future teachers. Please contact ben@algebra.org for more information about how to get involved in this work-- thanks Gay!

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    Jeremy Roschelel

    Guest
    March 21, 2017 | 07:28 p.m.

    Great to see the Algebra Project and its partners moving forward in this inspiring way. Could you share more on "what and how to ASSESS what is taught and learned in mathematics for students in the bottom quartile" -- what forms or aspects of assessment could contribute to dramatic improvement within your alliance?

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    Mary Project

    Guest
    March 27, 2017 | 04:25 p.m.

    Yes thank you Jeremy, so far both local and national efforts--our Director of PD Bill Crombie often works with teachers to develop formative assessments to use in their own classrooms; and we are workig with ETS on a DRK12 grant (PI E. A. Graf) to examine/adapt a learning progression for the concept of Functions to students in the "bottom quartile" and to develop appropriate assessments for formative assessment purposes.  We have been working with ETS through collaboration with the Policy Evaluation and Research Group at ETS.  However, in the Alliance, we hope to broaden this assessment work and so the design committee decided to put questions about assessment on our list of central questions for the various Voice groups to address:  Students, Teachers, Community members and School Leaders.  So stay TUNED...!

  • Icon for: J. 'Kemi Ladeji-Osias

    J. 'Kemi Ladeji-Osias

    Associate Professor
    March 21, 2017 | 10:26 p.m.

    Your video is definitely very inspiring and has the potential to impact a large number of students. Does your group consider the role of others in the community in supporting math literacy?

  • Icon for: Marcus Hung

    Marcus Hung

    Presenter
    March 21, 2017 | 10:57 p.m.

    Yes! We are definitely thinking about the role of others in the community, specifically community organizers and outside community-based organizations as we work together to develop this strategic plan and blueprint. Do you have any specific ideas on who and how to get others in the community involved in supporting math literacy? We'd love to hear your ideas! Thanks

  • Icon for: J. 'Kemi Ladeji-Osias

    J. 'Kemi Ladeji-Osias

    Associate Professor
    March 21, 2017 | 11:17 p.m.

    There are a number of groups that provide enrichment activities through after-school programs, libraries, museums, etc that may be able to integrate or support classroom learning.

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    Sheryl Clayton

    Guest
    March 24, 2017 | 08:14 a.m.

    It takes a village! 

  • Icon for: Marcus Hung

    Marcus Hung

    Presenter
    March 24, 2017 | 01:06 p.m.

    Yes it does!

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    David Dennis

    Guest
    March 27, 2017 | 08:44 a.m.

    We Work very closely with all organizations and groups that impact t impact the lives of children from the bottom quartile, such as, churches, YMCA, YWCA, State and city agencies, local civic and social organizations, educators, the targeted schools and school district,etc. we begin by putting together a design team composed of representatives from these groups in addition to parents and students from the targeted area where we are working. This design team then works with the SIAP team to identify the problem and to design a program to address the problem. This process allows for all voices to be represented at the table and to be part of the process which allows for local ownership. We use what we learned from our experience in the civil rights movement to move the process

  • Icon for: Carl Pettis

    Carl Pettis

    Associate Professor and Department Chair
    March 22, 2017 | 11:16 a.m.

    I love the comment from one of the gentlemen in the piece that spoke to the importance of students learning the value in solving a math problem and not simply learning how to solve a math problem. I would be interested to hear what thoughts were voiced during the meeting to help facilitate this change in approach.

  • Icon for: Marcus Hung

    Marcus Hung

    Presenter
    March 24, 2017 | 01:06 p.m.

    Just like Sheryl said, that clip brought home the meaning behind teaching and understanding math-- so well said! There were four main groups working on the questions of "what to teach? how to teach? what/how to assess the teaching?" and they were Students, Teachers, School Leaders, and Community Organizers. The various groups surfaced multiple thoughts on how to facilitate this change in approach and ultimately we're working on this together to propose multiple approaches and strategies from all sides. We'd love to hear any thoughts you might have as well. Thanks Carl!

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    Evelyn Teacher

    Guest
    March 25, 2017 | 04:04 p.m.

    Teaching students the value of solving a math problem is an idea that also spoke to me strongly.  I am a high school math teacher, and one strategy that has been helpful with my students is presenting them with a scenario or a set of information and asking them to create the questions that they will ultimately answer.  This has increased their curiosity, and their engagement in the follow through required to solve challenging problems.

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    Sheryl Clayton

    Guest
    March 24, 2017 | 08:12 a.m.

    Omg.  Outstanding video! This clip brought home the meaning behind teaching and understanding of teaching Algebra.  As a mathematics teacher as one of the gentlemen said "it is not just multiple 4 times 4, it is knowing how and why you get the answer and most of all problem solving"...... Great job

  • Icon for: Marcus Hung

    Marcus Hung

    Presenter
    March 24, 2017 | 01:00 p.m.

    Such a powerful statement! Thank you Sheryl for your voice in this because we are deeply in need of more parent/community voice in how we are together educating our young people. How can parents and families organize around this issue as well and what are new ways in which we can structure our understanding and practice of math in the homes so that schools are an extension and not the other way around? There's so much to this issue and we need to engage it from all sides! 

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    Mark Hoover

    Guest
    March 24, 2017 | 09:18 a.m.

    I'm a mathematics education researcher and teacher educator, working to improve mathematics teaching and learning within a larger effort to support public education and to establish a right to education as foundational to a democratic, just society.  I'm interested in Gay Stewart's question about "making 'how to teach' more concrete," in particular in ways that simultaneously engage students in the bottom quartile effectively in learning mathematics, convey the nature of the collective Algebra Project endeavor, and prepare them for earned insurgency.   

  • Icon for: Chris Boynton, EdD

    Chris Boynton, EdD

    March 24, 2017 | 10:25 a.m.

    The video is most inspiring !I love the perspective that we need to engage the student in a deep meaningful way - so deep in fact we must connect with them so that they are interested in the problem.  Might call this Math+

  • Icon for: Marcus Hung

    Marcus Hung

    Presenter
    March 24, 2017 | 12:58 p.m.

    I think that is at the heart of the problem-- how do we engage all students (especially the bottom quartile and those who have historically been absent from this conversation) so that they connect with the deeper meanings of math literacy in their life. This extends well beyond the classroom and so our approach has to encompass a plethora of support coming from the school and the community. Let's keep on pushing for a new vision for our students and our country in terms of building math literacy from the bottom up! Thanks for your comments!

  • Icon for: Joni Falk

    Joni Falk

    Center Co-Director
    March 24, 2017 | 10:47 a.m.

    This is a fabulous video and I am so pleased that it is a part of this showcase. It makes it clear that the program is embedded in a larger movement related to civil rights. I also know that this program has so many aspects to it and has evolved during the years. But I wonder if you can address how you measure your impact in some of the key aspects of the program? What are the key metrics that you use to gauge your progress and success?

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    Joan Wynne

    Guest
    March 24, 2017 | 06:04 p.m.

    Marcus, what a fabulous video you produced! You captured the spirit of the conference as well as the work of folks dedicated to creating excellence and equity in the education of our students, who have been pushed to the margins of an unjust society. Albert Einstein in one of his essays said, "Striving for social justice is the most valuable thing to do in life." I think his comment is particularly cogent in the context of the work of the Algebra Project, The Young People's Project, and The Southern Algebra Project Initiative, as they have for decades integrated social justice work into the work of mathematics. I suspect that most of the people at the conference came not only because of the challenge to replicate models of excellence in mathematical curriculum and pedagogy stolen from our students in the bottom quartile, but also because of their interest in creating models of excellence in a context of justice.

    The breadth and depth of the conference stirred my intellect and my soul and my dreams of a real democratic public school system where gifted curriculum and pedagogy is delivered to all of our students, all of the time.

    Thank you again, Marcus.  Joannie Wynne

  • Icon for: Marcus Hung

    Marcus Hung

    Presenter
    March 24, 2017 | 06:13 p.m.

    Thanks Joannie! I think your comments about the work we're engaged in is right on! We're in this together and I'm glad the video helped to capture and share that commitment. Looking forward to the continued work with you Joannie! 

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    Jay Gillen

    Guest
    March 25, 2017 | 10:19 a.m.

    Thanks, Marcus! I am encouraged by the growing Alliance commitment to centering young people in all aspects o the work. I think this connects to Kemi's point above, regarding support from community outside of schools. Young people are often integrated most effectively in community-based organizations--churches, after-school programs, sports leagues, community gardens, or clubs, internships, and so on. It's working from the places of young people's strong bonds with each other and with elders that will change math classrooms into youth-generated learning cultures. 

    Thanks again so much for this great work!

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    Wendy Menard

    Guest
    March 25, 2017 | 01:54 p.m.

    The work is so important, and the video inspires me further to work with my students in Brooklyn for greater access.  I am eager to discuss/learn from/participate in organized projects to achieve these goals.  

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    Courtney Ferrell

    Guest
    March 25, 2017 | 03:13 p.m.


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    Courtney Ferrell

    Guest
    March 25, 2017 | 03:31 p.m.

    Very inspiring video. I think a key piece for the success of this project is to do that research that shows that students who master Algebra are successful as adults - if we can gather statistics to show that students who pass algebra and algebra 2 in high school are the ones having successful careers later, that will motivate people to support and/or engage in this work, as well as motivate students to persist in studying and mastering algebra. So often as math teachers we hear "but when am I going to use this?" and so I LOVE the concept of framing algebra as problem solving - while they might not in the real world hear the phrase "solve for x" what they will do is be able to be persistent problem solvers. 

     

    Certainly the questions of "what to teach? how to teach? what/how to assess the teaching?" are so important and will be the bulk of what the Alliance works on - I also wonder, as Leslie mentioned, what research and statistics are out there that we can use to prove to our students that mastering algebra will open doors to opportunities in the global community later. 

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    Kate Belin

    Guest
    March 25, 2017 | 09:07 p.m.

    I agreee that when we teach from a problem-based approach that emphasizes reasoning over procedure, the students aren't nearly as concerned about the "when are we going to use this?" issue.  

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    Michael Miller

    Guest
    March 25, 2017 | 03:58 p.m.

    Marcus captures the content and spirit of the St. Louis gathering.  

    Mike

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    Robin

    Guest
    March 25, 2017 | 11:34 p.m.

    Thanks for putting this video together Marcus, it gave a sense of the spirit of the meeting for those of us who couldn't make it.  

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    Kate Belin

    Guest
    March 26, 2017 | 09:57 a.m.

    I appreciate Melenik's comment in the video that teaching not about how I learned or even (and this is even more difficult to come to terms with) about what I think my students should know, but about teaching them to become problem solvers and to demand access to mathematics.  

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    Marshall Milner

    Guest
    March 26, 2017 | 01:48 p.m.

    Excellent video. I would suggest that at the end of Bob's last comment on the video that you repeat the two screens "We the people ... Math Literacy for all." And then end with the NSF acknowledgement.

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    Sandra Laursen

    Guest
    March 26, 2017 | 03:04 p.m.

    Inspiring!  I'm looking forward to learning more about the strategies and tactics you'll be focusing on.  I think there's a good deal to be done to change teachers' implicit attitudes to raise their expectations and shift their mindsets about what these students can do.  Keep those good tunes from Sweet Honey going....

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    Nathan Larsen

    Guest
    March 26, 2017 | 04:18 p.m.

    Hi, All,

    I work in a high school and attended the convening in March. One thing that I think is implicit in the video, which is lovely, but was more explicit at the conference was the active role of young people in defining the problem. That's what happens in the spaces that the Algebra Project opens and I think the actions of defining and naming problems by young people is a significant part of why solving problems comes to be valued. This is exciting work and I feel fortunate to be part of the conversation.

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    Nell Cobb

    Guest
    March 26, 2017 | 05:09 p.m.

    Marcus,

    Thank you for the extremely creative and significant documentation of work this conference.  Since I was unable to attend, it was so important to see this active formation of our collaborative Alliance.  The video has helped me recruit others who might be interested in participating and building the Alliance.  As we work towards planning the May conference this video provides a great point of departure.  Again, I so appreciate you professional documentation.

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    David Henderson

    Guest
    March 26, 2017 | 06:07 p.m.

    Great video, Marcus!

    From my view point as a Professor Emeritus of Mathematics, I would say that what is radical about the Algera Project is that it operates with the conviction that all students are capable, through their own experiences, of understanding mathematics and being mathematically literate.

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    Paul Robbins

    Guest
    March 27, 2017 | 12:28 a.m.

    Thank you, Marcus for the inspiring video! I was a participant with the Community Voice working group, and I returned to my community with a renewed commitment, many ideas, and strong support from everyone in the greater Algebra Project community. The Education Justice Task Force of the North Bay Organizing Project, with which I am a participant has stepped out with a focus on encouraging the students in our community take the lead on issues of concern for them, with their parents and NBOP supporting them in every way and all the way. This is the first step in a journey that I believe will continue for the long haul and bear much fruit, particularly in the "literacies" of math and community engagement. This will be what deep democracy looks like!

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    David Dennis

    Guest
    March 27, 2017 | 08:22 a.m.

    GREAT JOB, Marcus!!!!

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    Mario Eraso

    Guest
    March 27, 2017 | 10:03 a.m.

    This video shows the power and vision of AP, YPP and SIAP. After the meeting in St. Louis, we have formed in Miami a local alliance between AP/YPP Miami, FIU School of Education and Broward County Public Schools. Lots of work, but meaningful and inspiring work. 

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    Timothy Glaude

    Guest
    March 27, 2017 | 11:05 a.m.

    Marcus captured the essence of great minds at work.  In the Division of Education and Counseling at Xavier University in New Orleans, we are tasked with preparing "reflective professionals." St. Louis was a testimony of how the "whole village" can and must shape this process.

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    Cliff Freeman

    Guest
    March 27, 2017 | 11:07 a.m.

    It was particularly interesting to see young people demanding what math ought to be taught and how it should be taught in classrooms. Who would have thought young people even cared about that? The young people who are a part of this alliance so far are ready to do the "heavy lifting" in teaching and learning the mathematics that is required for them to obtain entry level knowledge work... also known as the breadwinning professions of the 21st century.  The young people who are here also are looking for other young people who want to join the alliance and do work that is necessary for all of us to succeed.  

    Cliff, The Young People's Project

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    Menelik Washington

    Guest
    March 27, 2017 | 11:28 a.m.

    Hello All, 

    I really love how the production came out. I look forward to being able to bring what we've done in our time since to the next conference so that we can keep pushing toward a more equitable math education experience. Can't wait to see everyone again and continue the good fight. Also, we can never underestimate the importance of the social and emotional component of the learning process, especially as we seek to build a better future for the students.

    Best, 

    Menelik

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    gonzalo jove

    Guest
    March 27, 2017 | 11:59 a.m.

     This video captured the essence of the conference, all the comments of the presenters hit the nail on the head but the comment that really caught my attention was "The value of figuring out a problem" If we can present that to our students in a simple concise manner  then the teaching a concept will be so much simpler because they will know the value of the concept. Looking forward to some more learning.

    gonz

     

     

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    Laura Roop

    Guest
    March 27, 2017 | 01:47 p.m.

    As a participant attending the meeting, I was inspired to build bridges on multiple fronts on behalf of young people placed in the bottom quartile--those least well served. When I returned to Pittsburgh, I connected with Pittsburgh Public Schools colleagues to open a conversation about mathematics literacy, YPP, and AP, and I reached out to faculty colleagues at Pitt's Center for Urban Education.  Bob McLaughlin from New Hampshire was also at the meeting, and we began chatting informally about digital equity projects.  Subsequently, we reached out to Meg Peterson, director of the National Writing Project of New Hampshire, and Elyse-Eidman-Aadahl, executive director of the National Writing Project in Berkeley, CA.  NWP agreed to partner with the Collaborative on Digital Equity, and to pilot some kind of digital equity project in New Hampshire.

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    Lee McEwan

    Guest
    March 27, 2017 | 02:16 p.m.

    This is a beautiful video which tells this important story with clarity and style. The St. Louis event was hugely successful from my perspective for creating links among participants.

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    Jennifer Ghidiu

    Guest
    March 27, 2017 | 04:27 p.m.

    I feel honored to have taken part in this gathering, and i feel that this video represents the urgency, the passion and the creative work that the event elicited. I am fired up and ready to go!!

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    Annie Mickens

    Guest
    March 27, 2017 | 04:34 p.m.

    The video is exceptionally inspiring.  As a participant in the Community Work Group, I became even more encouraged to return to my community with  renewed efforts to help develop a more effective force of community presence and voice.  I am truly grateful for networking and collaborative opportunities that developed as a result of the February conference.   

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    Bill Preble

    Guest
    March 27, 2017 | 06:23 p.m.

    Marcus,

    I am so impressed with how perfectly you have captured the spirit of our meeting in St. Louis in this video. Congratulations and thanks!  

    Bob Moses stressed that the voices and the "heavy lifting" of young people must be front and center in this effort. I was so impressed with the roles that Cliff and the many other young people in the Student Voice Group played in St. Louis as they spoke and presented their ideas with such clarity and passion. Those young people reminded us all of the importance of inviting near-peer mentors into the learning process to help adults "translate" mathematical knowledge into language that their students can understand. They reminded us about the importance of relationships in the learning process, and the key role that social and emotional factors must play in our work if we are to be successful. 

    These are the things that the Algebra Project, the Young People's Project, and the Southern Initiative Algebra Project have been doing for decades.  The time is right for all of us to come together in this National Alliance to support young people and work in partnership with them to work for social justice and respectful, effective teaching in support of math literacy, especially for those students most in need of our support. 

    As Menelik said, "let's continue the good fight."

    Bill

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    Joan Wynne

    Guest
    March 27, 2017 | 08:19 p.m.

    Spot-on, Bill!  joannie

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    Joyce Harris

    Guest
    March 27, 2017 | 08:48 p.m.

    Providing our youth with the mindset, attitudes, skills and tools that make them confident that they can excel in mathematics are critical components to them developing proficiency not only in math but in other subject areas. It is important that our families and communities encourage our children and youth to believe that they can be competent in math! We must also hold schools and institutions accountable for creating affirming, challenging, accessible, and culturally engaging teaching and learning environments that build on the natural mathematical genius that so many of our children have.

    Joyce

  • Further posting is closed as the event has ended.